Can we trust greenhouse gas inventories? As global levels of methane continue to rise, an investigation by the BBC’s Environment correspondent, Matt McGrath raised serious concerns about the Paris Agreement when it revealed that methane from human and biogenic sources was not being measured accurately by countries – or at all in tropical regions. As well…
A tornado in a bottle and volcanoes erupting bicarbonate of soda “lava” proved popular at The Great Yorkshire Show, where they gave Leeds researchers Lindsay Bennett and Cat Scott an opportunity to talk about science. The researchers, who were demonstrating the handmade props with nothing more technical than pop bottles and lemons for the BBC’s Terrific Scientific  investigations,…
The imminent* calving of a 6,000 square-kilometre chunk of Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf has caused a buzz of interest in the global media, with University of Leeds’ Dr Anna Hogg widely quoted. The story of the “giant ‘white wanderer’ poised to break free” was covered by Jonathan Amos for the BBC (5 July), with…
What’s the link between the ocean floor and climate change? The question was put by BBC Radio Leeds presenter Keeley Donovan to Dr Christian Maerz, Principal Investigator for the ChAOS (Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor) project, who admitted the connection wasn’t an obvious one. “The ocean floor is the ultimate burial ground for carbon, if you…
Piers Forster writes about how a classic paper published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences  laid the foundations of modern climate models in a Nature News and Views piece, published today. Describing the 1967 paper by Syukuro Manabe and Richard Wetherald as “arguably the greatest climate science paper of all time”, Prof Forster says…